Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences

Home » Reblogged » The Reformation: Can Social Scientists Save Themselves?

The Reformation: Can Social Scientists Save Themselves?

From Jerry Adler in the Pacific Standard—on the credibility crisis in social science research, publication bias, data manipulation, and non-replicability. Featuring BITSS aficionados Brian Nosek, Joe Simmons, Uri Simonsohn and Leif Nelson.

Something unprecedented has occurred in the last couple of decades in the social sciences. Overlaid on the usual academic incentives of tenure, advancement, grants, and prizes are the glittering rewards of celebrity, best-selling books, magazine profiles, TED talks, and TV appearances. A whole industry has grown up around marketing the surprising-yet-oddly-intuitive findings of social psychology, behavioral economics, and related fields. The success of authors who popularize academic work—Malcolm Gladwell, the Freakonomics guys, and the now-disgraced Jonah Lehrer—has stoked an enormous appetite for usable wisdom from the social sciences. And the whole ecosystem feeds on new, dramatic findings from the lab. “We are living in an age that glorifies the single study,” says Nina Strohminger, a Duke post-doc in social psychology. “It’s a folly perpetuated not just by scientists, but by academic journals, the media, granting agencies—we’re all complicit in this hunger for fast, definitive answers.”

Read the full article here.


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